Sea Buckthorn Seeds for Sale

Sea Buckthorn Seeds and Plants for Sale


Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)



Go to www.jiovi.com for all seed and plant purchases.  Thanks!


Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)
Germination, Sowing and After Care Information

Sea Buckthorn seeds have a deep dormancy within them, this normally requires a degree of patience to overcome.  I have pre-cold stratified these seeds so they will germinate for you without a winter of cold treating.  You can expect a high level of germination. 

Sea Buckthorn seeds need at least 90 days of cold treatment. This (stratification) cold pretreatment has been done for you! These seeds are ready to germinate now. Soaking the seeds overnight or placing them in a damp sand and peat mixture in a zip top bag for a few days can speed up the germination time.  Keep newly planted seeds in flats or cells at about 70 degrees.

Do not expose seeds to high temperatures 77 degrees F (above 25 Celsius) otherwise a secondary dormancy may be induced and the seeds will not germinate until they have been pre-treated again. Germinated seeds can be planted in deep pots or plug trays in a good quality soil-less potting mixture .   Keep the seedlings soil moist. Germination is in about 10 days.  Growth is quick at first then slows to a steady pace.  Sea Buckthorn has an uncanny ability to not be bothered by sub-freezing weather after the first true leaves appear.  Try to harden off the plants as soon as practical.  Carefully transplant into larger pots or the garden anytime after they are a couple of inches tall.  The root systems are fragile on the young plants so, again, take special care handling them at this stage (not unlike any other plant).
 Growth accelerates rapidly in the second year. A  Yield per female plant averages 8kg or about 17 pounds.  This is dependent on age of the plant.  You can expect established plants to be productive for many years. 
I have found this method of obtaining Sea Buckthorn plants to be the best method for ending up with robust plants. There is no way to tell if the seed is male or female.  I expect an estimate of 50/50 male to female distribution is reasonable.  Buy Sea Buckthorn seeds for Fall planting and you will have large healthy plants often surpassing nursery plants in health. 


37 comments:

  1. You will see at checkout there is a 2.00 shipping charge added to each order. This is much less than it actually costs to package and mail, but it does keep the cost of the seed low. First Class Mail is used for all orders.

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    1. Hi Tom, I live in Canada (West Coast of BC)...would there by any chance I could buy some seeds...or do you know of any Canadian source available.

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    2. Hello, There isn't any problem sending these quantity of seeds to Canada. Plants are a different story altogether. So, If you are from Canada and would like to purchase some seeds, please do and Thank You!

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  2. Can you get it in supplemental form in the US or Canada and if so, who carries it?

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    1. If I understand your question correctly, yes. I have a deal with evitamins.com where if you use the coupon code "seaberry" you get $5.00 off of your order. The link is http://www.evitamins.com/?ref=seaberry The have juice (best price I have found) and Seaberry oil supplements. --Sorry it took a little while to answer your question -- Tom

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  3. From Jim via email--
    I am interested in your sea buckthorn plants. Need more info. Climate, how much one plant produces etc

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    1. Hello Jim,
      The blog has a lot of information. Try using the search box, it may be helpful with questions as they come to mind. To answer your question. Sea Buckthorn is a cold weather plant. It needs a period of cold dormancy like any deciduous plant to rest and prepare for spring growth. How much is up for debate. Some of the scientific literature estimates 800 hours or @ one month of temps below 40 degrees on average. This is a good rule of thumb. I must say that as my experiment moves forward I am finding much of the published information is incomplete. For instance I know of someone growing them in Austin, TX using shade cloth to protect the plants from extreme heat in the summer. I have no information regarding the berry harvest on those plants.
      Yield of course varies. Once the plant starts producing (3-4)years from seed they increase their output in year 5 when they are fully mature. After that, pruning, weather, etc. influences their output.

      Thanks for the question. I hope to have enough plants to satisfy the demand this coming growing season. Check back on the blog for when the sale of the plants begin early next year.

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  4. Will Sea Buckthorn survive the winters of Northern Michigan?

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    1. Dan, Yes Sea Buckthorn would be very happy in Michigan. They are extremely cold tolerant (down to - 40 deg F) in the winter. That is one of the reasons I became initially interested in Sea Buckthorn. The winters at my Maine Farm can easily drop below -20 deg F in the winter. The few I planted before the big field planting this past spring survived wonderfully. Thanks for the question.

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  5. Is it too late to plant seeds here in our garden beds of Southern Maine?

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    1. Hello Haydn
      I think it is a little late if you want to see any growth before winter. Seeding now and waiting for spring germination is referred to in the literature. I am experimenting with that now. If I were you, I would start some in January if you have a good seed starting set up or wait until late February if you are more of an experimenting type. The seeds I have now have a great germination rate but not sure how long the supply will last until the next shipment in April 2014.

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  6. I really like your blog, it has some great info in it. If I were to start some seeds indoors in the next month or so, what size of pots would you need to be to accommodate the roots until I'm ready to plant them in the spring? Do you think 1.5 inches x 1.5 inches and 6 inches deep would be enough? Thanks!

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    1. Thanks for the compliment, things like that keep me motivated. The size pots you describe would be fine. Once the plants get going, limit to one per pot. No rush thinning them but trying to separate them will damage the fine roots too much. When you do thin to one per pot, just snip the extras out. You don't say where you are writing from. I suggest, once they are growing to expose them to cool temps as soon as is practical in the spring. They are tough as nails once hardened off. I have some growing now and today is about 41 degrees and sunny. They are spending the day outside. I will bring them in later on. Fertilization of the seedlings in the winter is something I do but with a low nitrogen liquid fertilizer. I have found african violet products to be a convenient and easily obtained. Be most careful not to take too good care of them by over-watering or overdoing the fertilizer. Too much water increases the risk of damping-off and you really don't want them to grow too fast until we are closer to Spring. I would like to hear how it goes and I am sure other readers would as well. Good Luck!

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  7. Greetings and thank you for dedicating so much of your time to cultivating this wonderful plant.
    I ordered some seed stock from you today and want to start the plants right away do you have any experience or feedback from other growers about growing Seabuck thorn under LED grow spectrum lights. I am in Southern Ontario zone 5b which i think is the same as southern Maine. I want to grow them under mostly LED from Dec to March then move them slowly out side any thoughts.

    Cheers Alex

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    1. Hello Alex, Yes I am a bit obsessed with this plant and its potential. For the most part my experiment has gone well and I hope my experiences have added some to the information out there. To your question; I have not had any experience with growing under any type of artificial light. You should not have any trouble with starting the seeds the way you describe. I have some seedlings which are just about 20 days old in a sunny window and they are doing just fine. (I will be posting a few photos shortly) They are extraordinarily tough seedlings when exposed to plenty of available light and the cold just make them tougher. I planted some last year about a month before it snowed outside and they were not affected at all by the cold. I think the moral to that story is to not baby them regarding temperature too much. They quickly become "woody" when hardened off as you describe. This link is of some seedlings planted outdoors in September and they are about a month old. About 50% survived the entire winter without any intervention at all. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-X2N3NfVhnvQ/Tq8hhtv9uVI/AAAAAAAAIo0/WOM1JRh9StM/s1600/IMG_0280a.jpg

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  8. can u please give me some idea about the distribution of seabuck thorn (hipphophae) around the world and how much work had been done on this valuable plant? u can also send me reply on my email as well.
    villayataleevillayat@gmail.com
    thanks.........

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  9. can u please give me some idea about the distribution of seabuck thorn plant around the world and how much work have been done on this plant. thanks.....

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    1. Hello Villayat, I am just going to "google" my brain to answer off the top of my head. As early as the mid 1700's it was documented in the Scandinavian countries. A hundred years later, in the mid 1800's it was documented as occurring in the British Isles. There are 15 sub species. Most of the cultivated plants are subsp. sinensis, subsp. mongolica, and subsp. turkestanica in China, Central and Southern Asia, and Eastern Asia respectively. subsp. rhamnoides is commonly used in Europe. I think I will do a post with some more detail. There is a lot of work being done in every aspect of the plant. Hybrids have been developed and new ones are being tried. Fact is there is still an endless amount of work to do. One of the challenges is the long lag time between, say a hybridization producing a seed and the 3-5 years it take to see how it worked out. There are some short-cuts being tested to speed up the availability of established varietals like grafting etc. China still has the lock on production of Sea Buckthorn products. They just have the most acres under cultivation and over 30 processing plants. Millions of dollars have been invested to encourage and train local farmers to produce even more!

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  10. Maybe a crazy question but... you mention that there is no way to tell if a seed is male or female. However, is it possible to tell if a 1 or 2 year seedling is male or female in order to properly plant them in a permanent orchard to best facilitate pollination?

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    1. Hi Pete - There currently is no way to tell on a 1-2 year old seedling. The blooms are currently the only documented way to determine sex and they appear as early as year 3. If all goes well the production of the plant will be in high gear by year 5. Sexed plants are grown from cuttings taken from a known plant so one can be certain of those regarding the sex of the plant. I currently have about 500 plants which were grown from seed and are in my orchard. I am hoping to report that the 4 year old plants bloom this summer and the 3 year old plants in Maine (planted as 2 yr old transplants) are blooming there. We shall see. The question will be somewhat muted if grafting experiments prove effective. I'll keep everyone posted on the blog. Thanks for the question.-Tom

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  11. Would it be too late to start some seeds now (mid-June) or would it be better to wait until the fall or spring? I am in southern Maryland; the winters are mild and we should not have a frost until early November.

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    1. Hello, not too late. They can be started almost anytime. Just have enough time to harden them off in the sun before planting. I have planted them outside as late as October and the little seedlings made it through the winter just fine. http://seaberry-hippophaerhamnoides.blogspot.com/2012/01/seabuckthorn-seedlings-in-snow.html

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  12. Hello,
    I'm in Maryland, near DC. It's quite hot here during the summer. Does it make sense to pant seaberries in sunny areas here or is it better to plant in shady areas?

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  13. Definitely sunny areas. The plants are very drought tolerant which isn't a normal concern for your area. A decent amount of of water and lots of sun make the plants very happy. They will survive with a little shade but with lots of shade they will not be happy at all. Thanks for your seed order. They will be sent out right away.

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  14. Hi Tom, I got my seeds, thank you. I'm now in doubt whether to germinate some of the seeds right away under artificial lights in my basement to plant seedlings outside in a very late Fall or to wait until January or February, germinate in basement and plant seedlings in early Spring...

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    1. Hello Vladimir,
      Sorry it took a couple of days to respond. In Maryland, Sea Buckthorn seeds could be planted outside right now (late October). What you should have is about 30 days before the real cold weather is here to stay. Once they come up, they are nearly indestructible to frost and freeze. There is also the added benefit of them being hardened off right from the beginning. Once the winter weather sets in they will not grow but not die either and will come to life again in the early spring.
      If you want to start them inside, I would wait until January and get them hardened off and out into the garden as soon as you can even if it is just moving the trays outside during the day. When grown inside, damping off can be a problem for some of the seedlings, although I have never had all of them suffer from that peril. Another reminder whether planted outside or inside in flats, transplanting the small seedlings should be done with care. The new root systems are delicate so the less disturbance to them the better when moving them. This isn't true with older plants that have substantial roots with energy reserves. (like the plants we sell here). Good Luck and send some pictures if you can of your progress. Thanks! --Tom

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    2. I decided I was too noisy so you didn't answer. Didn't look later and decided to germinate my seed in a late winter. I'm sure it's OK - I'm starting it now. I'm in love with sea berry since I ate them from wild trees in the Asian and Caucasus mountain thirty years ago. Berries prepared with sugar are outstanding as well. Probably the tastiest preserve ever. Most of Russians are also aware of the magical healing qualities of sea berry oil.

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  15. Please, I would like to buy some sea Buckthorn seeds and I have problem how to order: where I give my address. I have to sign in? I live in Ottawa Canada.
    Thank you

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    1. http://www.ebay.com/usr/seboies - Hello, You can use this link to access all the seeds for sale from jiovi. I try to make everything easy right here on the site, but with so many operating systems and browsers, sometimes there are times when things don't work as smoothly as I would wish. Thanks for the question.

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  16. Will this plant survive in Austin, Texas?

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    1. Hello Yvette, Short answer is yes. The plant loves sun, so that is good, heat is ok for it too. Drought is tolerated but in the extreme heat of Austin in the summer, keeping it watered would be important. The longer part of the answer has to do whether it would fruit or not. I am not 100% sure about that since it is a plant that looses it's leaves in the winter and needs a cold period for the flowers to be prompted to form. Would there be enough cold days in Austin? I am not sure. There was only one anecdotal story I read once about someone who had them in Austin and kept them in a partly shaded area. If you try, please let us know how they work out.

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  17. Will it survive in Austin, Tx?

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    1. Hello Bruce, yes we can post to your country. We cannot control or be responsible for delays or confiscation by local customs and you should be aware the requirements where you live. Our experience sending to New Zealand is good. The packages are clearly marked and have made it to their destinations. We have a newer website for ordering at http://www.jiovi.com Thanks fo the question.

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  19. Are you able to purchase the fruit in the US.

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    1. buying seaberry fruit takes a little work since it is so rare. The best and most common place is a good Russian grocery. They may have it in the freezer section. If they don't, I'm very sure their supplier can get it. The Vermont Seaberry Co. has it too. I'm not sure what their inventory is. Here is their website http://vermontseaberrycompany.com/ Melissa has been extremely helpful over the years.

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